Canadian Grain Commission looking for CPS Red or Red Winter wheat samples

Program helps marketers, and farmers who participate receive a free grade and protein analysis

If you’re growing Canada Prairie Spring Wheat or Canada Western Red Winter Wheat, then the Canadian Grain Commission wants your samples.

“These are minor classes of wheat that not all producers grow,” said Twylla McKendry, program manager for Analytical Services with the Canadian Grain Commission. “We don’t have a lot of people in our database who grow CPS Red or Red Winter.”

These two classes have significant marketing potential with some of Canada’s key overseas wheat markets. McKendry suspects Alberta growers could be growing more of these classes than their Prairie counterparts.

Some Albertans have already submitted samples to the program, but more participation is still desired, said McKendry.

“We need people to go to our website and sign up so we can still send them out the (sample) packages,” she said.

Click here to visit the Canadian Grain Commission website and get your sample kit.

“These are minor classes of wheat that not all producers grow. We don’t have a lot of people in our database who grow CPS Red or Red Winter.” – Twylla McKendry

“These are minor classes of wheat that not all producers grow. We don’t have a lot of people in our database who grow CPS Red or Red Winter.” – Twylla McKendry
photo: Supplied

While these two classes are highly sought after, the Canadian Grain Commission still wants to collect variety samples from as many producers as possible. Producers in the free program take samples of wheat off their fields during the fall harvest. They then seal these samples in provided postage-paid envelopes, and mail them to the Canadian Grain Commission in Winnipeg.

“When they do that, we let them know what their grade is,” said McKendry. “If it’s not a top grade, we tell them what degrading factor has caused it to be a lower grade, and we also give moisture levels, protein levels, etc. for the crop they sent in.”

All of the samples from the Harvest Sample program are composited and used in processing tests, which can include making bread, noodles or pastas. Once samples are turned into processed goods, scientists determine the quality of the current year’s crop. Research scientists take this information and use it to promote Canadian wheat to overseas customers.

Each year, the Harvest Sample program receives about 12,000 samples from all crops across Canada. Growers have up until the end of harvest to submit their samples.

Growers who want to get their results can call the Canadian Grain Commission’s toll-free number, or get them from the website. Also, CGC representatives attend various farm shows, including Farmfair and Agri-trade and farmers can visit the booth and get a printout from the database.

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