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Wheat varieties to keep an eye on

A few that growers expect to do well in the coming years

Wheat varieties are a little like the pop music charts: There are always new hot stars, and fading ones.

Yes, there are some long-running chart toppers — take a bow, Stettler and CDC Go — but the list is constantly changing. Go back to 2013 and Harvest was running just behind Stettler for top spot. But last year, it didn’t make the Top 10.

Meanwhile, Muchmore only had its debut in 2014, but reached the No. 3 spot last year. However, it is poised to fall as it will move to the Canada Northern Hard Red class in 2021.

So who are the up-and-comers?

Here are some varieties that three Alberta growers expect to do well in the coming years. (Their 2017 acreages are in parentheses.)

“(For CWRS), I think Brandon (333,898 acres) looks to be the top variety, it has yield and protein. Cameron (760 acres) and Connery (18,488 acres) from Canterra as well as Viewfield (1,670 acres) and Landmark (1,496 acres) from FP Genetics also look like they have good potential. Many researchers have projects they are working on and it will be interesting to see what new varieties come from their work.” — Brent Konstapel, Spirit River

“I have the luxury of switching directions more readily than a seed grower. If there aren’t any problems with our current varieties, I’ll stick with what we have. The varieties I’ll be watching for in our area over the next couple of years for CWRS are Viewfield and Cameron. Also, Precision (3,639 acres) and Congress (1,268 acres) durum varieties may be promising.” — Kerby Redekop, Vauxhall

“With durum, CDC Precision and CDC Alloy (463 acres) look good due to top yield and quality retention. For hard red spring wheat, I’m high on Landmark VB due to being the shortest VB, semi-solid stem along with its top yields and sprout resistance. As well, AAC Viewfield should be good because of its yield, excellent standability and sprout resistance. For CPS wheat, SY Rowyn (825 acres) is one to watch — again for yields as well as IP contract premiums. Lastly, Wildfire winter wheat (118 acres) for yield, its rust package, and winter hardiness.” — Greg Stamp, Enchant

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