Online training for safe handling of anhydrous ammonia fertilizer

The popular fertilizer is a toxic and highly corrosive gas that needs to be treated with great care

Farmers can renew their training on the safe handling and use of anhydrous ammonia fertilizer through a newly updated safety manual and video put out by Fertilizer Canada.

Anhydrous ammonia is classified as a dangerous good under federal regulations. It bears the number 2.3 (8) — 2.3 means it’s a toxic gas while the (8) indicates it is corrosive — and anyone handling or transporting it must hold a valid training certificate. Farmers can sign their own certificate after taking training (as well as those of properly trained employees) and agri-retailers are required to ask to see the certificate when delivering a nurse tank.

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The video contains photos of someone who came into contact with the highly corrosive substance and details the proper protective equipment and first aid protocols if an accident occurs and someone is exposed to the gas.

It also has detailed step-by-step instructions on hooking up and disconnecting a nurse tank.

The video covers basics such as signage on tanks, inspection markings, hose tags, and other safety information as well as elements of an emergency response assistance plan.

“Fertilizer Canada is committed to providing relevant training materials to ensure the safe and secure use of fertilizer at all levels of the supply chain,” said Garth Whyte, Fertilizer Canada’s president and CEO.

“Farmers who rely on anhydrous ammonia will now have the most up-to-date information on the safe and secure handling of the product through these updated materials.”

The 37-minute-long video, entitled Anhydrous Ammonia Safety and the Farmer, along with a training manual is available for free at the Fertilizer Canada website.

Both the video can be viewed online but both it and the manual can be downloaded. (The manual is 1.3 MB in size but the video is 479 MB and would require a high-speed connection.)

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