GFM Network News


(Peggy Greb photo courtesy ARS/USDA)

Pulse weekly outlook: Manitoba dry beans in good shape

MarketsFarm — Despite temperatures ranging from near-freezing lows to sweltering highs and receiving little precipitation, Manitoba’s dry edible bean crop has weathered the conditions well, according to the province’s pulse specialist. “We’ve had some interesting weather over the last week to two weeks,” Dennis Lange, pulse specialist for Manitoba Agriculture at Altona, said, referring to […] Read more



You may have only got up close and personal to fababeans at a field day (such as Canolapalooza in Lacombe in 2019) but the pulse may soon be more widely grown — especially if aphanomyces limits the ability to grow peas and lentils every three or four years.

What can you grow if root rot kicks out peas and lentils?

You may need an eight-year break between those crops, but there are some other pulses to consider

Reading Time: 5 minutes With aphanomyces threatening peas and lentils, what can producers do to keep pulses in the rotation? Pulse growers are being urged to go up to eight years between plantings of either peas or lentils, which dominate pulse acres in the province. “Our susceptible crops are pea and lentil and, to a lesser extent, dry bean. […] Read more

Pinto beans. (Vergani_Fotografia/iStock/Getty Images)

Pulse weekly outlook: Manitoba crops emerge despite dry soils

Beans 'tougher than people think'

MarketsFarm — While Manitoba continues to deal with drought conditions in many growing areas, planting of pulses and soybeans is near done and some pulses are starting to emerge. “Pea and fava bean seeding wrapped up a while ago,” said Cassandra Tkachuk, production specialist for Manitoba Pulse and Soybean Growers (MPSG). “Dry bean planting actually […] Read more


Green lentils. (Savany/iStock/Getty Images)

Pulse weekly outlook: India’s tariff elimination has little effect on Canada

MarketsFarm — A temporary elimination of some import duties on three pulses currently has little effect on Canada, according to Mac Ross, director of market access and trade policy for Pulse Canada. Earlier in mid-May, the Indian government ordered the suspension of tariffs on pigeon peas, mung beans and urad/black gram lentils until Oct. 31. […] Read more

(Serts/iStock/Getty Images)

Pulse weekly outlook: India likely in need of more lentils

MarketsFarm — A recent webinar co-hosted by the India Pulses and Grains Association and Pulse Australia focused on lentil production in the two countries, with tighter Indian supplies likely leading to increased import demand going forward. “The share of Australian lentils in India’s import has been 10 to 15 per cent over the last seven-eight […] Read more


File photo of a pea crop south of Ethelton, Sask. on Aug. 1, 2019. (Dave Bedard photo)

Pulse weekly outlook: Peas, beans hold up in dry Manitoba

MarketsFarm — Of the pulses being planted in Manitoba this spring, field peas and dry beans appear the best able to handle the difficult drought conditions the province continues to experience throughout its growing areas. Field peas “have a relatively low water requirement, similar to dry beans,” Cassandra Tkachuk, production specialist with Manitoba Pulse and […] Read more

The yellow patches indicate that aphanomyces root rot has reached an advanced stage. But even if detected earlier, there’s nothing that can be done save not planting peas in this field for several years.

STACKED DECK: Root rot pathogen holds all the cards

You can’t spray aphanomyces or buy resistant varieties, so longer rotations are the only tool

Reading Time: 3 minutes Hard to spot, impossible to treat, and no resistant varieties. So when aphanomyces root rot does show up, you know you’ve got a long-term problem. “Once you see it, you kind of get scared and realize you’re stuck with it for a bit,” said Bow Island producer Will Müller. Because it is a soil-borne pathogen […] Read more


Root rot on peas — severe infestations can cut yields by 70 per cent while aphanomyces spores can linger in the soil for years.

Aphanomyces could become the new clubroot

Researcher recommends pea and lentil growers consider a seven-year break between crops

Reading Time: 5 minutes If not managed correctly, aphanomyces could be the next clubroot. And since longer rotations are the only effective management tool, pulse growers battling the soil-borne pathogen that causes root rot in peas and lentils could be facing a big-time reshuffling of what they grow. “Our recommendation now is to think about going one in eight […] Read more