Look for beef producers at big-city events this year

Alberta Beef has already signed deals with the Eskimos and the Stampeders

Get ready, beef producers, you’ll soon see yourself on a Jumbotron near you. Alberta Beef Producers unveiled a new marketing campaign and new marketing and education manager Brad Dubeau at its semi-annual meeting.

Brad Dubeau is the new marketing and education manager for Alberta Beef Producers.
photo: Alexis Kienlen

“The problem for marketing to solve is how to ensure consumer and producer confidence for beef production in Alberta to 2020 and beyond,” said Dubeau, who has been with ABP for six months.

Dubeau, who worked for the Canadian Hereford Association before joining ABP, has partnered with WS, a Calgary-based marketing agency.

The ABP used research from Canada Beef, Alberta Beef Producers and social listening from WS to determine its marketing messages.

Key messages were that beef is perceived as better tasting and more flavourful than other proteins, and that Alberta beef is seen as a quality product. Even though consumers might not trust farming operations, they see producers and ranchers as good, honest, hard-working people. Producers can build a rapport with consumers by sharing values rather than feeding facts.

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“Once trust is established, facts are more likely to be accepted. Positive conversations about beef versus defending negative comments has seemed to have a positive impact on sales,” said Dubeau.

Different targets

From the findings, Alberta Beef has determined the primary audience is the “well-intentioned consumer,” who makes up about 40 per cent of the urban population.

“We want this crowd to believe that Alberta beef is the best choice for their family,” said Dubeau.

The secondary audience is the “beef hedonist,” who makes up approximately 25 per cent of the population. This is followed by the “socially conscientious” and “millennials.”

As the campaign progresses, ABP will try to capture the secondary audience. But right now, it’s focusing on the first group. The primary goal is to communicate to consumers that Alberta beef sets the standard.

The new marketing campaign is called “All for the Beef,” and it’s meant to highlight the incredible talent of the Alberta beef industry.

As of 2017, ABP has already signed contracts with the Calgary Stampeders and the Edmonton Eskimos to run video and digital productions at nine home games, and on video TV screens throughout their stadiums.

“Hopefully you’ll get to experience it by going to a game or something,” said Dubeau.

ABP has also signed contracts to appear at the Calgary Stampede. Messages will appear on eight Jumbotrons throughout the park.

“The events that take place in the Agrium, that draw the largest consumer or urban audience, Calgary Stampede has agreed to put us in those venues. So again, we’re going to be hopefully talking to the producer and the consumer at the same time,” said Dubeau.

ABP will also have videos along the cattle trail in Stampede Park, has signed with Edmonton’s Northlands, and will be on the Jumbotrons in the Coliseum throughout CFR as well as the rodeo at K-Days this year.

“We’re going to be in the Northlands Expo Centre on its TV screens. I think there are about 15-20 TV screens through there. And our presence will run on those screens, basically through the middle of July until the end of November. So, any event that is taking place at the Expo Centre at Northlands Park, people will have the opportunity to see some positive messaging about Alberta Beef,” Dubeau said.

Further plans include a campaign landing site that will be linked to the Alberta Beef Producers website. Alberta Beef is also looking into partnerships with the Edmonton Oilers and the Calgary Flames, both of which have expressed an interest, as well as teams in the Western Hockey League.

About the author

Reporter

Alexis Kienlen

Alexis Kienlen lives in Edmonton and has been writing for Alberta Farmer since 2008. Originally from Saskatoon, Alexis is also the author of two collections of poetry, a biography, and a novel called "Mad Cow."

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