GFM Network News





McDonald’s CEO Steve Easterbrook (centre) and Canadian division head John Betts met with Crossfield rancher Graeme Finn (right) on their tour of Alberta ranches in 2015. Canada’s beef sector is now a model for the company as it seeks to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

McDonald’s raises the bar — but Canada’s beef industry already there

Fast-food giant wants to slash its carbon footprint, and Canada's beef sector is a model

McDonald’s plan to cut greenhouse gas emissions by one-third over the next dozen years is actually good news for Canadian beef producers, says the chair of the Canadian Roundtable for Sustainable Beef. “We’re far exceeding their expectations now and even into the future, so even for the 2030 goals, we’re well under it,” said Cherie […] Read more



Beef isn’t bad for the planet if you take a holistic approach to raising cattle, Nicolette Hahn Niman told Organic Alberta conference attendees.

Cattle aren’t actually killing the planet, says vegetarian rancher

Livestock’s environmental impact is complicated but done right, it’s good for the planet, says author

It’s become accepted wisdom that cattle production is worse for the environment than gas-guzzling SUVs — but it’s not true. “We’re told over and over again that cattle are bad for the environment and, therefore, everybody should eat less beef,” said Nicolette Hahn Niman, author of Defending Beef: The Case for Sustainable Meat Production. “We’re […] Read more

The groupthink on CO2 levels ignores some basic science

Views will change as atmospheric CO2 continues to rise with little or no significant change in global temperatures

As an agricultural producer, a former science teacher, and someone who is involved in the delivery of agricultural extension, I would like to submit some comments in relation to Daniel Bezte’s article in the Feb. 13 edition, “Articles on climate change provoke some readers“. The article’s title is entirely fitting because articles on climate change […] Read more


California to limit pollutants from diesel exhaust to cow gas

Reuters — California on Monday moved to restrict air pollutants from sources as diverse as diesel trucks and cow flatulence, the latest of several efforts in the most populous U.S. state to reduce emissions leading to climate change. Under a bill signed Monday by Democratic Governor Jerry Brown, the state will cut emissions of methane […] Read more

Tim McAllister was presented with his outstanding researcher award at the Canadian Beef Industry Conference earlier this month. From left to right, Beef Cattle Research Council science director Reynold Bergen, McAllister, council chair Bryan Thiessen, and Darren Bevans, a council director and general manager of Deseret Ranches.

Renowned Alberta researcher honoured

Tim McAllister has been awarded the 2016 Canadian Beef Industry Award for Outstanding Research and Innovation. McAllister, who grew up on a cow-calf operation near Innisfail, has gained international recognition for his work on antimicrobial resistance, beef cattle nutrition, silage science, greenhouse gas emissions, E. coli 0157:H7, and prion science. He is a principal research […] Read more


If these climate change predictions come true, massive heat waves will be the norm. The map on the left shows the current situation: Most of the Prairies is shaded blue (meaning 10 or fewer days when the temperature tops 30 C) with only Palliser’s Triangle in the light-green or yellow zones (20 to 25 days of +30 C). On the right is the prediction for the years after 2050 if there isn’t a reduction in greenhouse gases — with 30 to 45 days of scorching hot weather in a typical summer.

Southern Alberta could soon have Texas weather

Want to see the climate projections for your county? 
New online atlas predicts a sweltering future

Western Canada is on an “inevitable” march towards hot, dry summers and mild winters that will make southern Alberta feel like northern Texas, according to a new climate change mapping program. “One of the big, striking conclusions of the atlas is that, even if we reduce emissions, we still see substantial changes to our climate,” […] Read more

The massive root systems of prairie grasses mean they can store up to 130 tonnes of carbon per hectare.

Grasslands a carbon-capture colossus

Do the math: Take Alberta $15-per-tonne carbon tax and then look at how much carbon is stored in grasslands

If the Alberta government really wants to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the province, it should start with an incentive for farmers to reduce annual cropping, says a rangeland management expert. “There’s a pretty compelling case about why there should be a direct economic incentive for producers to maintain or even increase the amount of […] Read more