GFM Network News


To dramatize the issue of harvest losses, this video shows $5 bills blowing out the back of a combine. it’s not that bad, but the average grower could probably make $10 to $15 an acre by properly adjusting their combine — and some might be giving away $50 an acre or more.

Threshing losses could be costing you tens of thousands this harvest

Canola losses when combining are typically double — and sometimes five times — what they should be

How many tens — or hundreds — of millions of dollars might pour out of the backs of Prairie combines this harvest? No one can say for sure, but Vegreville producer Darcy Sarafinchan knows that if he’s not checking for issues when combining canola, the number can get big in a hurry. “When you start […] Read more

Thar she blows — and the only way to know how much grain is 
being blown out is to measure it.

Harvest loss a costly — and preventable — problem

Going just a bit faster can be way more expensive than any speeding ticket

Growers are leaving profit on the ground every time the combine hits the field. “You’ve grown it, you’ve put the inputs into it, and it’s free for the taking. Why not take it?” said Nathan Gregg, project manager at the Prairie Agricultural Machinery Institute. Harvest losses depend on the crop, but typically, one to two […] Read more


Harvest loss: An app and Top 10 tips

Here are two resources for calculating and reducing harvest loss. The Saskatchewan Soil Conservation Association has created a free app — SSCA Harvest Loss Calculator — for iPhones and iPads. The tool allows the user to enter the amount of seed in a sampling area of known size, either in weight, volume, or kernel number. […] Read more

Retired canola council harvest specialist Jim Bessel uses a one-square-foot drop pan to measure harvest loss quickly and easily.

Measuring harvest loss the first step to managing it

Save big bucks by measuring harvest waste, calculating the loss, and adjusting harvest management practices accordingly

In a drought year like this one, when every bushel counts, the last thing a producer wants to do is to leave grain on the ground. But harvest loss — to the tune of up to five bushels an acre — is a costly problem for growers across the Prairies. And more often than not, […] Read more