GFM Network News


Cattle can play a key role in maintaining grasslands.

Sustainable beef is working — but don’t let up on the messaging

Pandemic has increased consumer interest in where food comes from, and that’s an opportunity

Does sustainable beef matter in a pandemic? ‘Yes,’ a restaurateur and food distributor said at the virtual Canadian Beef Industry Conference — prompting the two farmers on the panel discussion to call for more co-operation to get the word out on what ranchers are doing for the environment. The public is definitely interested, said Darren […] Read more

Beef industry conference moves online

The fifth edition of the Canadian Beef Industry Conference will be a virtual affair, but the online event will also be free. The Aug. 11-13 conference will have a condensed program with three live sessions per day. Speakers include food trends expert David Hughes (aka Dr. Food) and South Dakota rancher and advocate Amanda Radke. […] Read more


A free virtual conference will take the place of the originally scheduled, in-person conference.

Beef industry conference pushed back until 2021

The in-person version of the Canadian Beef Industry Conference scheduled for Penticton, B.C. this summer has been postponed for a year. “2020 has not gone as planned for any individual, and as an industry the best thing we can do is continue to support one another through these challenging times and remain optimistic about our […] Read more

Ducks Unlimited Canada and the beef sector share the same focus on “water and grass,” says CEO Karla Guyn.

Conservation group backs beef sector

Ducks Unlimited wants people to see cattle as protectors of ‘threatened wetlands and grasslands’

Ducks Unlimited Canada and the beef industry have a lot in common, and can work together to preserve vital grassland habitat, says the organization’s CEO. “For us, our main focus is on water and grass. It’s the same focus for cattle producers as well,” Karla Guyn said in an interview. The relationship between her organization […] Read more


Cattlemen’s Young Leaders’ semi-finalists chosen

Eleven Albertans are among the 24 semi-finalists for this year’s Cattlemen’s Young Leaders program. The program pairs 16 young people with mentors who help them realize their career ambitions in the beef sector. The nine-month-long mentorship focuses on areas ranging from production practices to marketing and advocacy work. The Alberta semi-finalists are Tamara Quas- chnick, […] Read more

Bov-Innovation will offer a session on reducing drought impact through grazing and forage management.

Drugs and drought on the beef agenda

Alternatives to antibiotics and dealing with drought are on the agenda at this year’s Bov-Innovation. The event, part of the Canadian Beef Industry Conference in Calgary in August, will feature Coaldale vet and rancher Steve Hendrick talking about ways to prevent illness and infections. University of Saskatchewan professor, John McKinnon will speak about balancing rations, […] Read more


Beef Industry Conference returns to Calgary in 2019

Hockey and junk science are among the items on the menu at the Canadian Beef Industry Conference, which is returning to Calgary this year. Timothy Caulfield, a University of Alberta professor well known for debunking unfounded health claims, will be one of the keynote speakers. The other is Karl Subban, who grew up in Jamaica […] Read more

Those selected for the CYL program will have a nine-month mentorship with an industry veteran.

Twelve Albertans vying for Cattlemen’s Young Leaders’ spots

The 25 semi-finalists for the 2018-19 edition of Cattlemen’s Young Leaders program have been chosen. There are 12 Albertans among the semi-finalists: Jessica Giles, Jade Marshall, Melissa Downing, Travis Page, Melissa Van Sickle, Delanie Knull, Megan Clifton, Allana Minchau, Hildie Weibe, Max Allingham, Anessa Good and Kyle Lemmer. The final 16 will be chosen after […] Read more


Dr. Kip Lukasiewicz showed how to move cattle without the use of force or props during a session at the Canadian Beef Industry Conference.

Keep calm — and stay on the left — when working cattle

Nebraska veterinarian says the top priority is to demonstrate that people — a.k.a. ‘coyotes’ — are not really a threat


Stay on the left side of cattle and treat them right. That was demonstrated by Dr. Kip Lukasiewicz during a live animal-handling session at the Canadian Beef Industry Conference. “People create the interaction and the guidance,” said the Nebraska veterinarian and consultant who often works with feedlots on animal handling and facility design. What’s important […] Read more

Carcass defects are costly, and much of that cost ultimately works its way back to producers.

There’s lots of money being left on the packing plant floor

Quality defects exceed $60 per head and reducing those losses will boost the bottom line for producers, says expert

National Beef Quality audits prove that Canadian beef is pretty darn good. But they also show that producers could be putting more money in their wallets by reducing defects that show up at the packing plant, says Mark Klassen, director of technical services with the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association. The last audit, conducted in 2010-11, found […] Read more